3 Things to Know About Our Partnership with Wildlife Works

We’ve been working hard since 2009 to make a positive impact on the world through innovation and sustainability. Because we want to keep driving progress, we’ve recently partnered with Wildlife Works to help preserve threatened forests. With the support of TreeZero and other sustainability-focused companies, Wildlife Works is:

  • Protecting 1.2 million acres of forest in Kenya and the Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Preserving habitats for more than 300 wildlife species
  • Bringing sustainable development benefits to more than 200,000 locals

We are excited about this partnership and our goal is to share the benefits with you.

We’re Increasing the Sustainability of our Products

Through our partnership with Wildlife Works, our multipurpose paper is now carbon neutral. What does that mean? It means we’re cutting greenhouse gas emissions. We went back and purchased carbon offsets for every ream of paper distributed by TreeZero since the inception of the company. We’re committed to meeting the highest sustainability standards and will continue purchasing carbon offsets for future sales. 

We’re Helping the Environment

Saving the environment is no easy task and we understand people want to get involved. To continue moving the needle, our partnership with Wildlife Works is helping to provide training and employment opportunities to villagers near these forests. And by working together, Wildlife Works is helping to protect local wildlife, including elephants, giraffes and cheetahs.

 

 

We’re Advocating for Continued Change

It’s important to speak up and show the world you stand for something. We offer thanks to our customers – the thousands of companies and individuals who use TreeZero’s multipurpose paper every day. Together with Wildlife Works, we’ll continue to help preserve threatened forests and habitats.

This upcoming weekend, I’ll be at The Rethinking Animals Summit in New York speaking on the “Business for Sustainable Solutions” panel with Wildlife Works founder Mike Korchinsky. We’re sharing how businesses can be profitable while protecting the environment. We hope to inspire other businesses and more consumers to make sustainable choices – because every decision makes a difference.

Additional Resources

Easy ways to “go green” at the office to celebrate Earth Day

Earth Day is coming up at the end of the month. You’re already trying to be as “green” as you can be at home, so now it’s time to make your workplace just as sustainable.  There are lots of simple changes you can make to raise awareness of environmental issues, create a sustainable workplace, and encourage your co-workers to make and participate in sustainable choices.

Here’s a few ways to make any office Earth Day-ready:

  1. Think Before You Print. Refrain from printing things that can easily be read or saved on the computer. And, if you decide to print, TreeZero encourages you to use our tree free multipurpose paper. We also suggest that you set up your printers to print two-sided, set your margins as wide and your font size as small as possible. Not only will you save paper, but you’ll think twice about what you’re sending out.recycle bins
  2. Recycle Everything You Can. Recycling is one of the easiest, least demanding and least expensive ways to go green. Strategically place recycling bins around the office to encourage people to properly dispose of paper, aluminum, plastic, glass and other items. As your office becomes more involved in the recycling, you can also set up separate bins for items such as batteries and ink cartridges.biking to work
  3. Commute Smarter. Walk or cycle to work if you can.  Take public transportation (tip: buy bulk passes to save money). As a bonus with either of these two options, you’ll get additional exercise on your way to and from work.  If you must drive, carpool or car share.  According to the EPA, ditching your car for two days per week will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by an average of 1,600 pounds per year.dog at work
  4. Conserve Water. Keep a pitcher of water in the fridge instead of running the tap. Don’t pour left over water down the drain.  Use it to water the plants.  If you’re lucky enough to be able to bring your dog to the office, use left over water to fill the dog’s water bowl.green team 2
  5. Start a Green Team. Get your office to create a sustainability team. Gather team members from a cross-section of the company and work together to develop and maintain green practices for your company. Keep it fun and encourage company-wide participation rewarding creative ideas.  Your new Green Team can inspire, activate, and engage employees to create meaningful changes within your company.  Otherwise, what’s the use of these tips if no one is using them?

Let us know how you’ve made your office a more sustainable place to work. Share some of your favorite sustainable ideas.  We look forward to celebrating and supporting Earth Day 2017 with all of you!

Weekly Round-Up: Recycling, What Goes Around

Recycling is a series of activities by which material that has reached the end of its current use is processed into material utilized in the production of new products.

This week we’ll take a look at what’s happening within the world of recycling with a special focus on paper.

PAPER RECYCLING  –  Some Basic Facts

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, paper accounts for about half of all recyclables collected in the U.S., by weight. About forty-three million tons of paper and paperboard were recovered in 2013—a recycling rate of about 63 percent.

shredded office paper

Shredded Office Paper

The U.S. paper recovery rate increased by 1.4 percentage points in 2015 to a record-high 66.8 percent. The previous high point of 66.4 percent was recorded in 2011.

The paper recovery rate measured 33.5 percent back in 1990, which was the base year against which the American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) began setting its recovery goals.

AF&PA member companies have set a goal to increase the U.S. paper recovery rate to more than 70 percent by 2020. The 2015 numbers point to clear progress towards meeting the goal.

An estimated 58.6 percent of printing-writing papers were recovered for recycling in 2015, which is up from 53.0 percent in 2013 and 57.7 percent in 2014. The actual tonnage of printing-writing papers recovered for recycling declined 3.3 percent in 2015 but domestic purchases of these papers (i.e., new supply) fell by a more substantial 4.9 percent, which caused the recovery rate to increase.

Where Recovered Paper GoesData for the year 2015 indicate that 33.4 percent of the paper and paperboard recovered in the U.S. went to produce container board (i.e., the material used for corrugated boxes) and 11.8 percent went to produce boxboard, which includes base stock for folding boxes and gypsum wallboard facings. Net exports of recovered paper to China and other nations accounted for 39.8 percent of the paper collected for recycling in the U.S in 2015.  There are also some domestic uses of recovered paper outside the paper industry, including as base materials for insulation and molded pulp products.

Interested in starting an office paper recycling program? Download the Workplace Recycling Guide to learn more about how you can involve your office.

RECYCLING IN GENERAL

Find Recycling Locations for Materials from A-Z – With over 350 materials and 100,000+ listings, Earth911.com maintains one of North America’s most extensive databases. To get started, enter in the material you are trying to recycle along with your zip code and click search.

Habitat for Humanity ReStores are nonprofit home improvement stores and donation centers that sell new and gently used furniture, appliances, home accessories, building materials and more to the public at a fraction of the retail price.  ReStores are independently owned and operated by local Habitat for Humanity organizations. Proceeds are used to help build strength, stability, self-reliance and shelter in local communities and around the world. Habitat ReStores divert hundreds of tons from landfills each year, accepting hard-to-dispose-of items including new and used furniture, appliances and surplus building materials. In many cases, pickup service is provided for large items.

ReStore Habitat for Humanity

ReStore Habitat for Humanity in Hall County, GA

How2Recycle is a standardized labeling system that clearly communicates recycling instructions to the public. It involves a coalition of forward thinking brands who want their packaging to be recycled and are empowering consumers through smart packaging labels. Each How2Recycle label is based on the best availability of recycling data available, as well as critical technical insights from Association of Plastic Recyclers, Recycled Paperboard Alliance, and other insightful industry experts.

RecycleYourPlastics.org is an easy to use resource on plastics recycling for recycling professionals. The site includes resources such as user-friendly tips and tools, best practices, ready access to experts and peers in the recycling world and more.  Funding for RecycleYourPlastics.org is provided by the Plastics Division of the American Chemistry Council, representing leading makers of plastic resins.

Quick solutions to the most common recycling mistakesThe biggest contaminants are plastic bags, liquids, food, garden hoses, Christmas-tree lights, wire hangers, electronics, propane tanks, and auto parts.  Recycle plastic bags at grocery store locations that accept them.  If a bundle of recyclables reaches a 10% contamination rate, the manufacturer that purchases the recyclable materials can reject the load and charge back the cost to the sorting center.  When in doubt throw it out.

5 Simple & Practical Tips To Make Printing More Sustainable

Concern for our environment and sustainable practices have never been as important and popular than now.  As this awareness increases and stakeholders become increasingly sensitive to any and all efforts made to help our environment, more sustainable printing practices should be on the top of list.

5 Simple & Practical Tips To Make Printing More Sustainable

Here’s a list of five simple and practical printing tips that you can start implementing today at home or at your office to make your printing more sustainable.

Tip #1. Use tree free paper.  Using tree free paper is not only environmentally friendly and it’s usually as affordable as recycled tree-alternatives. (Did you know that using one pallet (40 boxes) of TreeZero  paper saves 24 trees?)

Tip #2. Print on both sides of the paper.  If you need to print, this is about as simple an environmentally friendly idea as you can get. Do it and you’ll halve your paper costs and cut down on your carbon footprint.

Select Two-Sided Printing

Select Two-Sided Printing

Tip #3. Maximize your margins. Many people default to standard margin settings out of convenience, but by expanding your margins you can significantly cut down on the number of pages printed, while still maintaining a professional look.

Tip #4. Use it again. You printed a test sheet and are about to toss it in the recycling bin, but there’s a whole side of blank paper just waiting to be used.  Pop your non-confidential documents back into the printer and use the other side of the page next time.

Recycling Bin

Use the back of paper from the recycle bin to make notes

Tip #5. Alternatives to Printing.  Ask yourself “Do I Need to Print?”  Challenge your printing habits.  You may still want to print some documents, but think about these alternatives:

  • Save, don’t print. Do you print because you worry you won’t find something online again? Transfer your paper organization skills to the computer.
  • Read on Screen. We want to find information online quickly. We tend to “scan” or “skim” as to read through online content.  If we see paragraphs with longer lines, we may tend to skip it.  This habit makes it difficult to read online but over time you can adjust your “skipping” habits and decrease your need to print.
  • Say No to Printing PowerPoint Presentations. Typically, PowerPoint presentations are filled with graphics and colored backgrounds and little text. Instead of printing, use the functions within PowerPoint to take notes or make comments. By writing the information down yourself you become more familiar with the material, can make digital edits others can easily use and be green all at the same time.
  • Use Scrap Paper and write it down.  Grab a sheet or two from the recycle bins near the printers. Use those to write your notes.

A Look At Deforestation: Last Year Billions of Trees Fell. Is Anybody Listening?

Deforestation is a huge and complex issue. In a note to US school children in recognition of Arbor Day in 1907, President Theodore Roosevelt wrote, “A people without children would face a hopeless future; a country without trees is almost as helpless.”

To put it into perspective, I can’t help but think of several often used and perhaps misconstrued idioms.  “We can’t see the forest for the trees.”  “You are barking up the wrong tree.”  Better yet, “Let me cut to the chase,” as we ponder:

  • How does deforestation impact you personally?
  • Are investments in your retirement fund financing deforestation?
  • How can we educate ourselves on the risks and opportunities related to deforestation?
  • Do you or your organization purchase goods or services that might increase levels of deforestation?
  • Are you measuring the potential risks of deforestation within your supply chain?
  • Does your organization have a plan for mitigating deforestation risks within your supply chain?
  • What positive steps can be taken to protect remaining forests and increase the benefits they deliver?

The Value of Our Forests

Forests are economic juggernauts generating valuable commodities like the paper and lumber we rely on daily.  Trees are cleared to build our communities. They feed us and provide fuel for billions globally. Forests are the source of many break-through ingredients used in medical advancements.

Forests provide all sorts of invaluable environmental services ranging from water filtration and temperature control to clean air and tourism. They are home to over half of the biodiversity and creatures on earth.   If we made a concerted effort to accurately account for the value of these environmental services, it would easily exceed trillions of dollars annually.

The Loss of Our Forests

World Resources Institute (WRI) estimates that, 30% of global forest cover has been cleared, another 20% has been degraded.  Most of the rest has been fragmented, leaving only about 15% intact.

Stumps of Fallen Trees

Billions of Trees Have Fallen, Is Anyone Listening?

The UN Climate Summit Report states the conversion of forests for the production of commodities such as soy, palm oil, beef and paper accounts for roughly half of global deforestation. Infrastructure, urban expansion, energy, mining and fuel wood collection also contribute in varying degrees.

Justin Worland reports in an article in Time magazine that “People cut down 15 billion trees each year and the global tree count has fallen by 46% since the beginning of human civilization.”  Deforestation and forest degradation account for anywhere between 10% – 20% of global greenhouse gas emissions.

According to the Union of Concerned Scientists, deforestation impacts climate change in various ways. The changes include: 1. directly reflecting heat by removing vegetation cover, 2. releasing greenhouses gases through clearing, 3. preventing forests from sequestering more carbon dioxide by cutting them, and 4. the generation of CO2 resulting from the use of bio-fuels.

The Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) and the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) are credible and growing responses.  But, I would argue, not nearly enough.  Fortunately, innovative new commitments and guidelines should spur increased measurement and commitment helping to stem the tide of deforestation.

Two Redwood Trees

Redwood Trees Providing Canopy

The respiration of our remaining boreal and rain forests are the lungs that inhale CO2 and breathe out oxygen for most of the creatures on the earth. Chuck Burr, founder of www.restorationseeds.com and the Southern Oregon Seed Growers Association estimates that, “when you walk from a modern immature woods into the old growth redwoods, the temperature drops 10 degrees F in the summer, the humidity increases 10 percent and the oxygen increase a few percent.  The bottom line is that the climate benefits of a plantation of 30’ (9m) trees is insignificant compared to a forest of 200’ (61m) old growth trees.”
Plain and simple, forests are invaluable and are in crisis.

It’s Time to Take Action – Saving Our Forests

In 2010 the Board of Directors of the Consumer Goods Forum approved a resolution to achieve zero net deforestation by 2020.  The aim is to achieve this through the responsible sourcing of key commodities (soy, palm oil, paper/pulp and beef) so sourcing these commodities will not deplete tropical rainforests.

Dozens of governments, scores of international corporations and more than 50 Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) signed the New York Declaration on Forests in 2014.  The goal of this non-binding agreement is to reduce forest loss by halve, end it by 2030 and restore forest lands by an area larger than India. Meeting these goals would cut between 4.5 and 8.8 billion tons of carbon annually.

In 2016, institutional investors with $22 trillion in assets requested that companies report data about forest risks through the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP).  According to the report, Revenue at Risk: Why Addressing Deforestation Is Critical to Business Success, the total annual turnover at risk for publicly listed companies is estimated to be up to $906 billion.

The United Nations has created a mechanism that enables organizations to participate in efforts that can combine carbon reduction and neutrality efforts with programs that incentivize people and communities to engage in activities that preserve and expand forest canopies.  Better known as REDDReducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries  this methodology was launched in 2008.

TreeZero & 100% tree free, carbon neutral copy paper

At TreeZero, our copy paper is 100% tree free and carbon neutral.  TreeZero recently partnered with the environmental group Wildlife Works to participate in their REDD projects in Africa.  The Wildlife Works projects have been successfully third-party validated and verified against the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) methodology, and the Climate, Community & Biodiversity Standard (CCB) at the GOLD level.  Two-thirds of the funds dedicated to TreeZero’s carbon neutrality efforts go to local communities in Kenya and the Democratic Republic of the Congo to provide incentives to stop deforestation.

TreeZero is a proud to partner of Wildlife Works and we hope that our customers and consumers find our commitment to the environment of value to their businesses and their sustainability strategies.

Conclusion

If we don’t measure forest related impacts and risks to our organizations and nature – how can we expect to manage and minimize these risks? If we don’t manage them, they are likely to end-up managing us. “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem.  Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”  Theodore Roosevelt, October 1907.

Taking Paper to the Next Level

Taking Paper to the Next Level

Welcome to TreeZero’s blog – “Taking Paper to the Next Level”.

Our goal is to reach that next level for paper products by remaking the way we make things with innovation and sustainability.

Innovation is in our DNA and Sustainability is its partner. As our name implies, there are ZERO trees used in the making of our multipurpose copy paper. Seriously, a paper product made with no trees! 100% tree free paper is the most forward-thinking advancement in the paper industry since the introduction of recycled paper in the 1970’s. Forests along with the animals and the communities that rely upon them for their lives and livelihoods need innovation like this! And, we as a global community do too! We use agro fiber waste – specifically sugarcane waste fiber – for our multipurpose copy paper for the manufacturing process as raw material and renewable fuels as our major manufacturing functions.

Not only do we approach the way we make things differently, but we are committed to do so in a sustainable manner. Our TreeZero paper is also Carbon Neutral. What does that mean? We have determined the CO2 generated from our product’s entire value chain – from the growing and processing of the sugarcane through the manufacturing, distribution and disposal of the paper.  TreeZero has committed to offset these carbon emissions through the purchase of a corresponding amount of carbon credits. We are participating in REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) projects managed by Wildlife Works in Kenya and the Democratic Republic of Congo. By doing this, TreeZero is the only tree free, carbon neutral copy paper in North America!

Thank you to the thousands of companies – large and small, colleges and universities, government agencies and individuals who use TreeZero paper every day and care about the environment like we do.

We’ll use this blog forum to share our thoughts with you about a variety of subjects and topics.

Thanks for tuning in, sharing, and being a part of the journey.