The Green Guy | 07-02-2017- TreeZero and GO2LED

The Green Guy | 07-02-2017- TreeZero and GO2LED

A version of this interview originally aired on The Green Guy.


The Story

Recently, our CEO Mike Nilan and our EVP of Sustainability Jeff Foote joined The Green Guy show to sit down and discuss how TreeZero reinvented a consumer product we all use – paper.

Below is the recording along with a few excerpts from the interview. You can also find the entire conversation on the show’s website!

 

The Facts

  • Mike Nilan is Co-Founder and CEO of TreeZero, an Atlanta-based sustainable solutions company that markets, supplies and distributes agro-fiber paper and other environmentally responsible products for Fortune 2000 companies, colleges and universities, government agencies and consumers with a passion for sustainability.TreeZero’s flagship product TreeZero paper is the only premium, 100 percent tree free, carbon neutral paper made from sugarcane waste fiber. It is completely recyclable within existing recycling systems and compostable. According to Ricoh, TreeZero paper delivers excellent print quality when compared to regular recycled paper. TreeZero paper is available at major office supply distributors such as Office Depot/Office Max®, Ricoh Canada, Staples®, Veritiv™, Artlite and W.B. Mason, online at Amazon and in-store at FedEx® Office.Prior to founding TreeZero, Nilan was the CEO of an international sourcing company, The MarketSource, which focused on consumer goods for companies like Pepsi and Tropicana for eight years. Prior to The MarketSource’s success, Nilan served as the Founder, Chairman and CEO of One Coast Network, the largest wholesale gift and home accessory company in North America. To learn more about TreeZero, visit their website, and follow them on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.
  • Jeff Foote was appointed Executive Vice President of Sustainability for TreeZero in 2017 to oversee the strategic direction of the company’s sustainability efforts. Foote is charged with marketing and distributing a revolutionary paper product that could potentially save millions of acres of trees each year, in addition to leading the company’s carbon neutrality project and developing the business’s relationships with major environmental groups. Foote previously worked at The Coca-Cola Company, where he was a distinguished sustainability leader for more than 20 years. During his time with Coca-Cola, Foote was an influential leader and conservation-minded executive who played a key role in developing world-class sustainability goals for the company. Foote’s leadership and accomplishments are felt within the local community and around the world. In his hometown of Atlanta, Foote currently serves on the board of the Georgia Recycling Coalition and has previously supported the City of Atlanta Mayor’s Task Force on Controlled Environment and the Green Spirit Farms of Georgia. In his quest for sustainability, he has traveled to all seven continents including Antarctica, where he led two leadership and teamwork expeditions to help inspire over 150 business leaders to reduce impacts on climate and to promote water stewardship. To learn more about TreeZero, visit their website, and follow them on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.

Business RadioX | Mike Nilan and Craig Ramsey with TreeZero and Paula Munger with NAA

Business RadioX | Mike Nilan and Craig Ramsey with TreeZero and Paula Munger with NAA

A version of this interview originally aired on Business RadioX.


The Story

Recently, our CEO Mike Nilan and our President Craig Ramsey joined Business Radio X’s High Velocity show to sit down and discuss TreeZero’s origins, its partnership with Wildlife Works and insights the company’s plans for the future.

Below is the recording along with a few excerpts from the interview. You can also find the entire conversation on the show’s website!

 

The Highlights

Business Radio X: What was it like marketing this product early on? Was the idea embraced? Were you laughed at?

  • MIKE: The last paper introduction to the office supply business was in the mid-‘70s, when recycled paper was introduced – that was the last innovation. So, when we came with a 100 percent tree free, carbon neutral paper, they embraced us. Because now they have something new to bring to their customers, and now they have a sustainable paper they can bring to their sustainable customers that can move the needle for them as well.

BRX: Now that you have access to a larger distribution, does that mean you’re done?

  • CRAIG: Oh no, we’re just getting started. What the TreeZero team has done so far that has been incredible is one-on-one calls with customers – making them aware and bringing them on board. Now that we have that, we’re also going to introducing new products that have the same core material, and are also carbon neutral.
  • MIKE: Really, anything you see in an office that is made from paper – notepads, composition books, calendars, ledgers – they can all be manufactured with our tree free, carbon natural paper. After that we’re going to go into commercial printing, as well as the food industry, where we’ll have the only tree free and carbon neutral plates, cups, trays and napkins. on the market. So we have a lot of new products to follow our copy paper, and most of them have been developed already.

BRX: How do you market your paper to customers?

  • CRAIG: What we’ve found is that sustainability is not a program, it’s not a project, it’s not a trend – it’s here to stay. And so buying our paper is one of the easiest decisions a company, university or government agency can make, because it’s a commodity product they know they’re going to be using, it’s great for the environment and its carbon neutral.
  • MIKE: And it’s affordable!

BRX: Can you talk a little about your partnership with Wildlife Works?

  • MIKE: Manufacturing our paper emits about 42 percent less CO2 emissions versus virgin paper, but there is some carbon output. So to make up for this, we buy our carbon credits through Wildlife Works. And we don’t just buy credits just to buy them. We buy credits that affect the very serious deforestation issues in the Congo and in Kenya, and we also impact the local communities through protecting wild animals, as well as helping the local impoverished communities. So it’s a full circle model, and we do it for the prime purpose of protecting the forest.

The Facts

  • Mike Nilan is Co-Founder and CEO of TreeZero, an Atlanta-based sustainable solutions company that markets, supplies and distributes agro-fiber paper and other environmentally responsible products for Fortune 2000 companies, colleges and universities, government agencies and consumers with a passion for sustainability.TreeZero’s flagship product TreeZero paper is the only premium, 100 percent tree free, carbon neutral paper made from sugarcane waste fiber. It is completely recyclable within existing recycling systems and compostable. According to Ricoh, TreeZero paper delivers excellent print quality when compared to regular recycled paper. TreeZero paper is available at major office supply distributors such as Office Depot/Office Max®, Ricoh Canada, Staples®, Veritiv™, Artlite and W.B. Mason, online at Amazon and in-store at FedEx® Office.Prior to founding TreeZero, Nilan was the CEO of an international sourcing company, The MarketSource, which focused on consumer goods for companies like Pepsi and Tropicana for eight years. Prior to The MarketSource’s success, Nilan served as the Founder, Chairman and CEO of One Coast Network, the largest wholesale gift and home accessory company in North America. To learn more about TreeZero, visit their website, and follow them on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.
  • Craig Ramsey was appointed President of TreeZero in 2016, assuming leadership of the company’s entire value chain.  Prior to joining TreeZero, Ramsey spent over 30 years with Accenture where he was a member of the North America leadership team and headed the Atlanta office – one of the largest Accenture offices in the world during the last ten years of his tenure with Accenture. From there, he oversaw business development and client service for the company’s southeastern region and was a leader in market growth, corporate citizenship and community involvement.Craig has a Bachelor of Science (finance and risk management) and MBA from Florida State University. He has lived in Atlanta since 1982 with his wife and their four children. To learn more about TreeZero, visit their website, and follow them on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.
  • Paula Munger is Director of Industry Research and Analysis at the National Apartment Association. In Paula’s role at NAA she has established an active NAA research program, to include leading research efforts on topics of importance to the industry and the association, implementing and managing specific research projects, and providing insight in government and other relevant data impacting apartments.Paula has previous experience at Cushman & Wakefield, The Federal Reserve and is a graduate of New York College at Buffalo. Find out more about NAA on their website, and connect with them on Twitter and Facebook. You can also connect with Paula on LinkedIn.

 

Southeast Green | TreeZero Partners with Wildlife Works to Protect Threatened Forests in Africa

Southeast Green | TreeZero Partners with Wildlife Works to Protect Threatened Forests in Africa

Partnership Expands Commitment to Innovation and Sustainability

A version of this article appeared in Southeast Green.

TreeZero, a sustainable paper company, has announced a partnership with Wildlife Works to support the preservation of threatened forests in Kenya and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Additionally, the partnership has enabled TreeZero to become carbon neutral and offset its product carbon emissions.

“Our partnership with Wildlife Works joins two organizations focused on innovative solutions to conserve the world’s biodiversity,” said Mike Nilan, CEO of TreeZero. “We care about the world we live in, and we have products made in a way that positively impacts the environment today – and for generations to come.”

TreeZero’s premium, multipurpose paper is made from sugarcane fiber waste that is 100 percent tree free. The company achieved carbon neutrality for its paper by offsetting the carbon emissions generated from producing and processing the sugarcane, and manufacturing, distributing and recycling the paper. TreeZero has retroactively purchased verified emission reductions (VERs), also known as carbon offsets, for every single ream of paper produced and sold since the inception of the company – and has made the commitment to continue to purchase carbon offsets for future sales.

Wildlife Works is the world’s leading REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) project development and management company. REDD+ is a climate change mitigation strategy envisioned by The United Nations to stop the deforestation responsible for pumping more than 7 billion tonnes of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere each year and accounting for 15 percent of global annual greenhouse gas emissions – more than the entire worldwide transportation sector.

“By creating value for standing trees through partnerships with organizations such as TreeZero, we’re able to fund our conservation efforts in Africa to protect forests and the wildlife that live in them,” said Mike Korchinsky, founder and president of Wildlife Works. “With TreeZero and other progressive corporations, we’re protecting 1.2 million acres of forests and preventing more than 5.4M tonnes of C02 emissions from being released each year for the 30-year life of the project. We’re also bringing sustainable development benefits to more than 200,000 local people who live in the forest area, in addition to protecting habitat for more than 300 species of wildlife.”

Approximately 300 million tons of paper is consumed worldwide each year.[1] According to the World Resources Institute, more than 80 percent of the Earth’s natural forests have been destroyed with 40 percent of deforestation driven by the paper industry.

“TreeZero is providing an alternative to paper production for those who want top quality paper and have a desire to move the needle on deforestation,’” said Nilan. “At the same time, we challenge others to go beyond conventional thinking to create solutions that further the circular economy.”

Nilan and Korchinsky are on the “Business for Sustainable Solutions” panel at The Rethinking Animals Summit in New York, May 6 and 7. They will discuss the TreeZero and Wildlife Works partnership and illustrate ways businesses can be profitable while protecting the environment and biodiversity.

3 Things to Know About Our Partnership with Wildlife Works

We’ve been working hard since 2009 to make a positive impact on the world through innovation and sustainability. Because we want to keep driving progress, we’ve recently partnered with Wildlife Works to help preserve threatened forests. With the support of TreeZero and other sustainability-focused companies, Wildlife Works is:

  • Protecting 1.2 million acres of forest in Kenya and the Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Preserving habitats for more than 300 wildlife species
  • Bringing sustainable development benefits to more than 200,000 locals

We are excited about this partnership and our goal is to share the benefits with you.

We’re Increasing the Sustainability of our Products

Through our partnership with Wildlife Works, our multipurpose paper is now carbon neutral. What does that mean? It means we’re cutting greenhouse gas emissions. We went back and purchased carbon offsets for every ream of paper distributed by TreeZero since the inception of the company. We’re committed to meeting the highest sustainability standards and will continue purchasing carbon offsets for future sales. 

We’re Helping the Environment

Saving the environment is no easy task and we understand people want to get involved. To continue moving the needle, our partnership with Wildlife Works is helping to provide training and employment opportunities to villagers near these forests. And by working together, Wildlife Works is helping to protect local wildlife, including elephants, giraffes and cheetahs.

 

 

We’re Advocating for Continued Change

It’s important to speak up and show the world you stand for something. We offer thanks to our customers – the thousands of companies and individuals who use TreeZero’s multipurpose paper every day. Together with Wildlife Works, we’ll continue to help preserve threatened forests and habitats.

This upcoming weekend, I’ll be at The Rethinking Animals Summit in New York speaking on the “Business for Sustainable Solutions” panel with Wildlife Works founder Mike Korchinsky. We’re sharing how businesses can be profitable while protecting the environment. We hope to inspire other businesses and more consumers to make sustainable choices – because every decision makes a difference.

Additional Resources

Easy ways to “go green” at the office to celebrate Earth Day

Earth Day is coming up at the end of the month. You’re already trying to be as “green” as you can be at home, so now it’s time to make your workplace just as sustainable.  There are lots of simple changes you can make to raise awareness of environmental issues, create a sustainable workplace, and encourage your co-workers to make and participate in sustainable choices.

Here’s a few ways to make any office Earth Day-ready:

  1. Think Before You Print. Refrain from printing things that can easily be read or saved on the computer. And, if you decide to print, TreeZero encourages you to use our tree free multipurpose paper. We also suggest that you set up your printers to print two-sided, set your margins as wide and your font size as small as possible. Not only will you save paper, but you’ll think twice about what you’re sending out.recycle bins
  2. Recycle Everything You Can. Recycling is one of the easiest, least demanding and least expensive ways to go green. Strategically place recycling bins around the office to encourage people to properly dispose of paper, aluminum, plastic, glass and other items. As your office becomes more involved in the recycling, you can also set up separate bins for items such as batteries and ink cartridges.biking to work
  3. Commute Smarter. Walk or cycle to work if you can.  Take public transportation (tip: buy bulk passes to save money). As a bonus with either of these two options, you’ll get additional exercise on your way to and from work.  If you must drive, carpool or car share.  According to the EPA, ditching your car for two days per week will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by an average of 1,600 pounds per year.dog at work
  4. Conserve Water. Keep a pitcher of water in the fridge instead of running the tap. Don’t pour left over water down the drain.  Use it to water the plants.  If you’re lucky enough to be able to bring your dog to the office, use left over water to fill the dog’s water bowl.green team 2
  5. Start a Green Team. Get your office to create a sustainability team. Gather team members from a cross-section of the company and work together to develop and maintain green practices for your company. Keep it fun and encourage company-wide participation rewarding creative ideas.  Your new Green Team can inspire, activate, and engage employees to create meaningful changes within your company.  Otherwise, what’s the use of these tips if no one is using them?

Let us know how you’ve made your office a more sustainable place to work. Share some of your favorite sustainable ideas.  We look forward to celebrating and supporting Earth Day 2017 with all of you!

5 Simple & Practical Tips To Make Printing More Sustainable

Concern for our environment and sustainable practices have never been as important and popular than now.  As this awareness increases and stakeholders become increasingly sensitive to any and all efforts made to help our environment, more sustainable printing practices should be on the top of list.

5 Simple & Practical Tips To Make Printing More Sustainable

Here’s a list of five simple and practical printing tips that you can start implementing today at home or at your office to make your printing more sustainable.

Tip #1. Use tree free paper.  Using tree free paper is not only environmentally friendly and it’s usually as affordable as recycled tree-alternatives. (Did you know that using one pallet (40 boxes) of TreeZero  paper saves 24 trees?)

Tip #2. Print on both sides of the paper.  If you need to print, this is about as simple an environmentally friendly idea as you can get. Do it and you’ll halve your paper costs and cut down on your carbon footprint.

Select Two-Sided Printing

Select Two-Sided Printing

Tip #3. Maximize your margins. Many people default to standard margin settings out of convenience, but by expanding your margins you can significantly cut down on the number of pages printed, while still maintaining a professional look.

Tip #4. Use it again. You printed a test sheet and are about to toss it in the recycling bin, but there’s a whole side of blank paper just waiting to be used.  Pop your non-confidential documents back into the printer and use the other side of the page next time.

Recycling Bin

Use the back of paper from the recycle bin to make notes

Tip #5. Alternatives to Printing.  Ask yourself “Do I Need to Print?”  Challenge your printing habits.  You may still want to print some documents, but think about these alternatives:

  • Save, don’t print. Do you print because you worry you won’t find something online again? Transfer your paper organization skills to the computer.
  • Read on Screen. We want to find information online quickly. We tend to “scan” or “skim” as to read through online content.  If we see paragraphs with longer lines, we may tend to skip it.  This habit makes it difficult to read online but over time you can adjust your “skipping” habits and decrease your need to print.
  • Say No to Printing PowerPoint Presentations. Typically, PowerPoint presentations are filled with graphics and colored backgrounds and little text. Instead of printing, use the functions within PowerPoint to take notes or make comments. By writing the information down yourself you become more familiar with the material, can make digital edits others can easily use and be green all at the same time.
  • Use Scrap Paper and write it down.  Grab a sheet or two from the recycle bins near the printers. Use those to write your notes.

Weekly Round-Up: A Focus on Deforestation

Each week we’ll provide you with a round-up of news, information and happenings on a different topic effecting the environment including deforestation, climate change, sustainability, water stewardship, recycling and more.

This week, we’re focusing on Deforestation. World Resources Institute (WRI) estimates that, 30% of global forest cover has been cleared, another 20% has been degraded. Most of the rest has been fragmented, leaving only about 15% intact.

The Round-Up

Plant trees while you search the web – Ecosia is the search engine that plants trees with its ad revenue. Share Ecosia and show friends how they can do good just by searching the web. https://info.ecosia.org/what

Deforestation rises with incomes in developing economies – by John C. Cannon – Economists have for the first time shown a definitive link between rising incomes and a corresponding uptick in deforestation using satellite mapping data. For a long time, economists have assumed that this more-or-less predictable pattern exists in developing economies, but it’s been difficult to prove. “Until now, nobody had found a way of testing it empirically in a convincing way,” said Jesús Crespo Cuaresma, an economist at the International Institute for Systems Analysis (IIASA) and the Vienna University of Economics and Business. The researchers also expected that reforestation would occur in richer countries as income levels rose, but their research did not bear that out. https://news.mongabay.com/2017/01/deforestation-rises-with-incomes-in-developing-economies/

Ceres and the PRI Join Forces to Tackle Tropical Deforestation – Ceres and the PRI announced a new partnership to tackle widespread, global deforestation driven by escalating production of beef, soy and timber, focusing initially on South America.  Through a new, joint investor group, the two organizations will support global institutional investors pressing food and timber companies to eliminate deforestation and other related concerns, including forced labor and land rights disputes from their supply chains. The announcement was made at an investor event at the United Nations climate negotiations in Morocco, formally called the Conference of the Parties, or COP22. Deforestation is a key topic at COP22, with an estimated 12 million hectares of forest being destroyed annually from human activity, or the equivalent to 36 U.S. football fields every minute. Cutting down forests releases carbon into the atmosphere, and an estimated 10 to 15 percent of global carbon emissions are produced annually from global deforestation, largely for agricultural and timber production. “Beyond the enormous environmental impacts of biodiversity loss, climate change and eroded landscapes that are less climate-resilient, deforestation poses real financial risks to investors with agribusinesses in their portfolios,” said Dawn M. Martin, who spoke at the event and is the chief operating officer of Ceres, which coordinates the $15 trillion Investor Network on Climate Risk. “Working collaboratively will enable Ceres and PRI to achieve far greater impact at stemming deforestation than each of our organizations could achieve alone.” Among the activities planned by the new global investor group over the next two years: Map and develop a set of indicators for evaluating beef, soy and timber companies’ sourcing policies and their impact on deforestation (e.g., traceability, sustainability goals and policies, transparency, adherence to certification schemes); Benchmark 50 to 60 companies in the beef, soy, and timber industries against the indicators. Based on benchmarking results, engage with low-scoring companies (including through shareholder resolutions) to press them to adopt sustainable sourcing policies. Engage in public policy advocacy at the national and international levels. http://3blmedia.com/News/Ceres-and-PRI-Join-Forces-Tackle-Tropical-Deforestation

Deforestation Free Funds is a search platform that enables people to find out if their money, in the form of individual investments or an employer-provided 401(k), may be causing tropical deforestation through investment in companies that produce, consume, or finance palm oil – the fastest growing cause of rainforest destruction today. Some companies are making real efforts to reduce the harm that this industry causes – and the goal of Deforestation Free Funds is to help make this happen. By driving transparency in the industry’s financing, we hope to encourage policies and practices that bring about real change. https://www.deforestationfreefunds.org/faq#about

The New York Declaration on Forests – is a non-legally binding political declaration that grew out of dialogue among governments, companies and civil society, spurred by the UN Secretary- General’s Climate Summit. For the first time, world leaders endorse a global timeline to cut natural forest loss in half by 2020, and strive to end it by 2030. It also calls for restoring forests and croplands of an area larger than India. Meeting these goals would cut between 4.5 and 8.8 billion tons of carbon pollution every year – about as much as the current emissions of the United States. The Declaration is endorsed by dozens of governments, [30] of the world’s biggest companies, and [more than 50] influential civil society and indigenous organizations. The associated voluntary Action Agenda (section 2) serves as a guide to governments, companies, and organizations regarding the diverse set of actions that can achieve these transformational goals. http://forestdeclaration.org/summary/

 

Atlanta Magazine | Atlanta-based TreeZero produces tree-free paper

Atlanta Magazine | Atlanta-based TreeZero produces tree-free paper

The product is created from a sugercane-processing byproduct

A version of this article appeared in Atlanta Magazine.

Michael Nilan has never been one to overlook a great idea. In 2010, while on a business trip to China, the entrepreneur stumbled across a plant that produced paper without using a single tree. Inspired, Nilan shuttered his old business, which outsourced jobs for American companies like Tropicana and Westinghouse, and cofounded Atlanta-based TreeZero, which produces and distributes tree-free paper to both consumers and organizations. Its customers include Aflac and the CDC.

After discovering quality-control issues at the China plant, Nilan and his partner Ed Kennedy located another mill in South America, but its formula included 5 percent pine—a problem for a company already incorporated as TreeZero. No matter: The pair worked with engineers to eliminate pine from the equation before signing an exclusive contract with the mill.

TreeZero makes high-quality paper from a sugarcane-processing byproduct that is typically dumped in a landfill or incinerated. The production process is not just ecofriendly—it actually helps the environment.

The paper industry, including local giant Georgia-Pacific, has long presented recycled paper as ecofriendly. But according to Nilan, TreeZero performs better—leaving less dust in printers and absorbing ink crisply—because it has never been remanufactured.

This article originally appeared in our November 2014 issue under the headline “Sweet”

Atlanta Business Chronicle | Tree-free paper company exec fills demand

Atlanta Business Chronicle | Tree-free paper company exec fills demand

A version of this article appeared in Atlanta Business Chronicle.

Paper comes from trees. That is a fact people learn early in life. Michael Nilan is working to change that.

A self-proclaimed “tree hugger,” Nilan has created TreeZero Paper Co., an Atlanta-based company that produces and distributes sustainable 100 percent tree-free paper solutions to the office supply, printing and packaging industries. Instead of trees, the paper is made from sugar cane waste product.

“This is the ideal way to produce paper. Clearly, we have the most sustainable paper product in the world,” Nilan said. “Our goal is to become the leading provider of sustainable paper products all made from sugar cane waste.”

TreeZero was founded in 2009 to address the growing need for environmentally sustainable practices in the paper industry.

“I am a businessman and entrepreneur along with being someone who cares about the environment,” he said. “My partner, Ed Kennedy, and I were doing a project in China and we found a paper made from sugar cane and bamboo. … Copy paper and packaging paper is a high-volume and high-velocity product so we knew it would make a big impact.”

But the men ran into quality problems with the product so they continued their quest to find a tree-free product. That led them to South America, where they found a mill manufacturing paper from 95 percent sugar cane and 5 percent pine.

“But we had already named the company TreeZero so that 5 percent pine presented a problem,” Nilan said. “We worked with engineers to remove the pine and ended up with a product that works in manufacturers’ machines and is consistently a better quality than recycled paper. And because recycled paper has been so heavily processed, our product is actually easier on copy machines. We believe this can save millions in copy machines maintenance fees.”

TreeZero’s copy paper is being sold to FedEx, Staples, Office Depot, Emory University and other entities that have a sustainability initiative.

Individuals can purchase TreeZero through Amazon.com.

Mother Nature Network | Review: Tree-free copy paper

Mother Nature Network | Review: Tree-free copy paper

TreeZero’s copy paper is made without any tree products.

A version of this article appeared in Mother Nature Network.

Although you may know how to reduce paper waste in your office through double-sided printing and other measures, there is yet another way to save the trees — tree-free copy paper. Yes, that’s right, tree-free copy paper.

No tree-based wood fibers are used to create the product, instead the paper is made completely from sugar cane fibers.  You can recycle TreeZero paper with the rest of your paper products, but you have another recycling option due to the product’s 100 percent sugar cane base — composting. The product is compostable, so once you’re done with the paper simply put it in your compost bin and you’re done!

Deforestation has been a concern for decades and despite educational campaigns, it remains an issue today. TreeZero is proud to say that no trees have been harmed in making their product. While sugar cane is a renewable source and it can be harvested twice a year, TreeZero does not harvest sugar cane for paper production. Instead, the company uses sugar cane byproducts to make its ISO 9001 certified paper.

My family was able to test this sugar cane paper throughout the month of October, and here’s what we thought:

Pros:

  • Tree-free: This was particularly interesting to my tree-loving children.
  • Compostable: The ability to put the paper in the compost bin instead of setting it aside for recycling is extremely convenient.
  • Texture: I’m a fan of the texture of this paper. While traditional copy paper is slick there is a noticeable texture to this paper, which makes it easier to handle, especially when working with multiple sheets at one time.
  • Standards: The paper is the standard 8.5 x 11 in size with a 20-pound weight. This is perfect for printers, copiers and paper-based fax machines. My inkjet printer readily accepted the paper because it is the standard size and weight of traditional copy paper.